Andrew P. Moore http://www.andrewpmoore.com Taking Life Apart to See How It Works Thu, 28 Apr 2016 19:04:07 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=4.5.10 Reconditioning a Delta Table Saw- Finished http://www.andrewpmoore.com/reconditioning-a-delta-table-saw-finished/ http://www.andrewpmoore.com/reconditioning-a-delta-table-saw-finished/#comments Thu, 28 Apr 2016 18:55:42 +0000 http://www.andrewpmoore.com/?p=988 In my last post I walked through prepping and painting the table.

I have finally gotten the whole table put together.  I was able to find a great belt that works and I tested the saw last night.  It all works!!  I am going to try and make a plate cover and sled this [...]]]> In my last post I walked through prepping and painting the table.

Parts ready

Parts ready for assembly

I have finally gotten the whole table put together.  I was able to find a great belt that works and I tested the saw last night.  It all works!!  I am going to try and make a plate cover and sled this weekend.  I hope it comes out OK.

Here are my finished product pictures:

 

  • Delta 36-650 t2 - front

    Delta 36-650 t2 - front

  • Delta 36-650 t2 - top

    Delta 36-650 t2 - top

  • Delta 36-650 t2 - side with fence

    Delta 36-650 t2 - side with fence

  • Delta 36-650 t2 - underside front

    Delta 36-650 t2 - underside front

 

I feel like this turned out AWESOME! I really enjoyed working on this table and look forward to building some incredible furniture and wood projects with it.  Although- It was a huge frustration and disappointment to me at how hard it is to get OEM or direct parts for this saw.  Most of the important parts I am missing are no longer produced or in stock.  This included the plate for the saw hole and the blade guard.  Additionally I found that Delta has a 2 week backlog on just shipping a part.  I eventually found some of the parts I needed at Sears Parts Online.  I ordered a belt and it should be here in a day or so.  This was not an expensive project and lots of fun.  I believe I have a very solid table that looks great.  If anyone knows what a table like this is worth or has any feedback on parts or general ideas- PLEASE post on the comments below.

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Reconditioning a Delta Table Saw – Part 2 http://www.andrewpmoore.com/reconditioning-a-delta-table-saw-part-2/ Thu, 28 Apr 2016 18:55:07 +0000 http://www.andrewpmoore.com/?p=986 In my last post I showed how I broke down the table and the condition of what I was working with:

To prep the table for reconditioning, I used Goo-Gone and 400 grit sandpaper on the all the legs, motor housing and anything with paint on it to scuff out scratches and prep the [...]]]> In my last post I showed how I broke down the table and the condition of what I was working with:

Delta 36-650 T2

Delta 36-650 T2- Before Prep

To prep the table for reconditioning, I used Goo-Gone and 400 grit sandpaper on the all the legs, motor housing and anything with paint on it to scuff out scratches and prep the surface to take new paint.  I used a Rustoleum paint for farm equipment.  I liked the Troy-built red.  I also used a flat back.  I did not prime first, but used at least 4 layers of paint for each part.  This took the better part of an entire Saturday to do.  I also taped off stickers, metal signage and other portions of the saw I did not want to paint with blue painters tape.

Here are my paint and prep pictures:

 

  • Box prep- Repaint

    Box prep- Repaint

  • Box prep- Repaint 2

    Box prep- Repaint 2

  • Motor - Repaint

    Motor - Repaint

  • Wings and wheels- Repaint

    Wings and wheels- Repaint

  • Box flat black- Repaint

    Box flat black- Repaint

  • Stand - Repaint

    Stand - Repaint

  • Pre-finished Wheel- Assembly

    Pre-finished Wheel- Assembly

  • Wing and Fence - Paint

    Wing and Fence - Paint

 

It was a good thing that the bolts, screws and washers/nuts all had very specific sizes.  It made it very easy to group them and reassemble without loss or stripping.  This thing also weighed a TON.  So I would advise you have some help when putting it back together.

Here are my reassembly pictures:

 

  • Parts ready

    Parts ready

  • Cleaning the fence

    Cleaning the fence

  • 36-650 Wheel- Assembly

    36-650 Wheel- Assembly

  • Motor Attachment- Assembly

    Motor Attachment- Assembly

  • Categorizing Hardware- Assembly

    Categorizing Hardware- Assembly

  • Attaching the Tilt and Motor Brace - Assembly

    Attaching the Tilt and Motor Brace - Assembly

  • Side Wheel Attachment- Assembly

    Side Wheel Attachment- Assembly

  • Base and Top - Assembly

    Base and Top - Assembly

  • Motor- Assembly

    Motor- Assembly

  • Motor - Assembly 2

    Motor - Assembly 2

 

I greased up all the tilt and raise components and tested the saw’s movement.  I used simple synthetic lube.  I may change to a different lube in the near future.  I did not do a full restore on the fence handle.  I may go back and do that as it has a few nicks and bumps I may want to clear out.  Before I finished up, I applied a polishing compound to the wings and also applied liquid Carnauba wax.   I was hoping this would help with shine and dust.  My plan is at some point to build a dust collector underneath and put this guy on a wheel frame so I can roll it around.

 

Check out my finished table on the next part of my post:

 

Part 3 – Finished Product

 

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Reconditioning A Delta Table Saw – Part 1 http://www.andrewpmoore.com/reconditioning-a-delta-table-saw/ http://www.andrewpmoore.com/reconditioning-a-delta-table-saw/#comments Wed, 27 Apr 2016 19:39:12 +0000 http://www.andrewpmoore.com/?p=903 I had the good fortune of being offered a table saw by my father in law.  I was and still am very grateful for the gift.  I love my saw.  He told me it had been in the outside garage and was in rough shape- but the motor was still good.  It only needed a [...]]]> I had the good fortune of being offered a table saw by my father in law.  I was and still am very grateful for the gift.  I love my saw.  He told me it had been in the outside garage and was in rough shape- but the motor was still good.  It only needed a belt.  He said it was really heavy- so my brother in law and I headed out to his place in the country to pick it up one Saturday a few weeks ago.  I thought it may need some small cleaning up.  I had not expected a reconditioning project.  But, I did decide it was time to stretch my comfort zone and tackle a complete restoration.  I broke the project into multiple posts due to how many pictures we had.  I wanted the pages to load better for people on their mobile device.

Here are my before pictures: 

 

  • Delta 36-650 T2

    Delta 36-650 T2

  • 36-650 1.5 Hp Motor Before
  • 1.5 HP Delta Motor- Underside

    1.5 HP Delta Motor- Underside

  • Delta Metal Leg Stands- Before

  • 36-650 Underside- Before

  • Delta 1.5 HP 36-650 Motor Cover Plate - Before

  • Rusted Bolts, Nuts, Etc...

  • Extension Wing Plates- Before

 

What you see on the top of the table is a coating of rust.  The steel plate used for the table top must have picked up some moisture from being in an open garage.  I also found some pretty deep scratches and a few really good sized wasp nests.  Again- this was in an outside, open air garage for years.

After further investigation this was a Delta Contractor Table Saw.  It is a Model 36-650 T2.  I found the instruction manual online.   It has a 1.5 Hp motor and a 10 inch blade.  I know very little a bout saws and even less about how to value them.  Based on the little bit of information I could find, the saw looks like it was worth at least a few hundred dollars on the re-seller’s market and probably cost over $1000 dollars new.   I figured if I put a couple of hundred into it- it was worth the effort.

I first plugged in the motor and switch to ensure they ran.  Once I determined that the motor worked, I tested to ensure the blade would spin and the adjustment wheels worked as expected.  I was missing the belt, motor cover plate, plate cover and plastic cover arm assembly.  I thought I could find these replacement parts fairly easily (WRONG), so I started to disassemble the entire cabinet down to the last rusted bolt and screw, starting with the motor.

Here are my tear down pictures: 

 

  • Part Number

    Part Number

  • Main Box- Tear Down

    Main Box- Tear Down

  • Underside- Tear Down

    Underside- Tear Down

  • Internal Motor- Tear Down

    Internal Motor- Tear Down

  • Legs- Tear Down

    Legs- Tear Down

  • Side Struts- Tear Down

    Side Struts- Tear Down

  • Total Stand- Tear Down

    Total Stand- Tear Down

 

After tearing down the entire saw-  I soaked the bolts and hardware in white vinegar overnight.  This removed almost all the rust.  I had to immediately spray paint them as the oxidation from exposure to air began to re-rust the parts in just a few minutes of being removed from the vinegar.

Hardware vinegar bath

Hardware vinegar bath

I also used an angle grinder on the metal portions of the table to remove all the rust.  I purchased a brush for the grinder.  Once complete- I used metal polishing wads that I purchased at Auto Zone to remove extra grit and dirt as well as wishing with WD-40.

2016-04-17 18.43.57

Steel top- After grinding with brush

Steel top- After grinding with brush

Check out my prep work on the next part of my post:

 

Part 2- Prep Work

 

 

 

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Veggie Tales- My Vegan Experiment http://www.andrewpmoore.com/veggie-tales-my-vegan-experiment/ Wed, 12 Feb 2014 21:17:39 +0000 http://www.andrewpmoore.com/?p=835 I make fun of people who don’t eat meat.  I eat bacon and burgers because I am a man and it is my right to eat animals.  Men who do not eat meat are weak and  unable to care for themselves or others.  People who choose to be vegans or vegetarians are hippies.  Life sucks [...]]]> I make fun of people who don’t eat meat.  I eat bacon and burgers because I am a man and it is my right to eat animals.  Men who do not eat meat are weak and  unable to care for themselves or others.  People who choose to be vegans or vegetarians are hippies.  Life sucks and is not worth living without eating animals. I think that about covers my opinions regarding diet over the last 10 years of my life.

I spent the better part of the last 2 months poisoning myself with food, alcohol, allergy medication and lack of exercise.  The holidays can be a killer-  literally.  I gained between 6 and 8 pounds and was sleeping like crap.  I was tired and irritable.  So I decided to do what every other American does after New Year’s Day.  I created a resolution to change my eating habits and get healthy again.  Except this time, I was going to try something I had never tried before.  I  was going to go all veggie and see what it was like to live in that world.  This was an experiment in not only eating and health, but walking in someone else’s shoes.  I will post updates on how it went and what I have been doing.  Keep checking in…

Eat it!

Eat it!

 

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My Garden – Mid Season Results http://www.andrewpmoore.com/my-garden-mid-season-results/ http://www.andrewpmoore.com/my-garden-mid-season-results/#comments Fri, 29 Jun 2012 17:31:05 +0000 http://www.andrewpmoore.com/?p=801 Well its been 4 months with my SFG.  Let’s see what we learned.

I could not imagine how much fun I have been having with growing my own food.The fact that  I have yielded only a few peppers,  some peas and a carrot is of little consequence to me.  I have been learning about what to do and what not to do regarding my square foot garden. Let’s start with my dogs.

First Lesson:  Dogs and other animals.  The dogs sometimes get to go to doggy day care where they can play for a day with other dogs.  There is an 8’x8′ box of sand they get to dig in there.  Yay for my dogs.  Not so good for my garden.  I had to install a little fence around the garden.  You will see the black decorative, wire fence around the garden.  This sucks because it is hard to work on the garden, but it is good for some of my  plants that vine like peas.  After the fence was established and I caught the dog trying to get in once….  once was all it took to deter them.

Next lesson and most important:  Either start growing from seed in January or late December indoors or buy established plants in mid February.  This is critical.  I have certain plants that are still far from mature and it is July.  I am lucky that Houston will allow for long periods of summer growth, but it is still a pain to have lots of tomatoes but no peppers in July.

Water:  I cannot tell you how important it is to keep the soil moist.  I make sure I water a few times a week for at least 30 minutes. I know when the plants stop trying to grow, that the soil is getting dray.  It is important to check in a few different spots for moist soil.  Go down a couple of inches in the soil and make sure you are not just getting the top wet.  Roots will only go as deep as there is water.

 

The final and most important lesson: Better space planning.  Now that I know what the plants look like when mature, I have to find a better way to plant them.  I found a space planner online: Vegetable Planner.  I am not sure if this will work, but I am curious to see what else out there.   At first, the squash plants covered the pepper plants, then the peas covered the outside of the garden.  Now the tomatoes are so big, they cover the other side of the garden.  A lack of light and foliage from other plants will kill a garden.

I have learned to keep plants that vine and tomatoes on the far side of the garden to cast shade out of the garden and not over it.  It is critical to provide a high and wide lattice for the plants that vine as well.  I have also learned that gourd plants like squash will get a different section of garden in the future.  I will plant only a couple of them.  These gourd plants will destroy your garden if you put them too close to other plants.

I will post more pics of what we harvest.  This has been so much fun and the whole family likes helping.  I hope this has been helpful to others. Share your stories about your garden. Anything you know that would help me or others?  Leave a comment!

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Updates! http://www.andrewpmoore.com/updates/ Tue, 26 Jun 2012 02:57:52 +0000 http://www.andrewpmoore.com/?p=754 I have been working hard to get all of the posts from GBFSE over to the blog.  I will also be updating the links on the site with all of the info I have gathered about training over the last year.

I will also be updating new posts as I gear back up to begin working on [...]]]> I have been working hard to get all of the posts from GBFSE over to the blog.  I will also be updating the links on the site with all of the info I have gathered about training over the last year.

I will also be updating new posts as I gear back up to begin working on an actual book.  I am not sure what the book will be about or how long the book will be- but the plan is to try and get something together over the next few months.  I just have to get in the habit of writing again.

Thanks for all you guys who have checked the blog over the last few years.  I am sorry I have been slow to post, but I will make sure I get back in gear ASAP.

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My Garden – Prepping the SFG http://www.andrewpmoore.com/my-garden-prepping-the-sfg/ Mon, 27 Feb 2012 03:49:27 +0000 http://www.andrewpmoore.com/?p=696 This is a simple post.  Nothing about leadership or achievement.  This is one of the newer posts about taking things apart.  I wanted to dismantle something that was core to survival.  I decided to dismantle the art of growing vegetables.  The idea seemed so foreign to me and so difficult to achieve, yet so simple and elegant.  I knew that my grandmother could grow tomatoes, so I figured I could too.

I set out to create a garden and grow my own food for many reasons.  The least of those was to prove I could do it.  One of the most important reasons was so that I knew where my food was coming from and didn’t have to depend on the local HEB to provide my family sustenance.  I also wanted to understand the process and systems that had to be used in order to grow food.  In my new found athletic training, I found so much rides on what goes in our bodies.  I needed to know how my food was grown and where my food came from.

My brother in law showed me a very elegant and simple design for a robust but space efficient garden.  It’s calles a Square Foot Garden (SFG).  These are very popular due to the amount of food you can yield with a very small space.  The idea is to create a 4′ x 4′ square in your backyard using untreated 2 ‘ x 4’s.It is very simple. I purchased mine from Home Depot and had them pre-cut them.  I have a saw- I was just being lazy.  I used 3″ Deck screws on each side to join them together; 3 per side.  Once you have your square – remove your grass and put down a barrier to keep new grass from getting in.  Make sure you level the square.  You don’t want a lopsided box.  Then fill it with soil you are about to make.

The soil is the interesting part.  For the entire previous year I was creating my own compost.  I had no real use for it until I created the SFG, but I knew that at some point I wanted to stop throwing away my leftover veggies and wanted to find a good use for them. I had a good 40 lbs of pure black compost to use.  I mixed this with 1/3 peat moss, and 1/3 vermiculite and rounded out my compost with another bag of manure to make a perfect mixture for the soil.  I tossed it all on a tarp and mixed it careful not to puncture the tarp- which I did accidentally. I recommend using a tarp you can afford to lose for top shelter.

My son helped me get the soil in the garden and then I used screws and good twine to section off the garden in 1′ sections.  I had 4 on each side of the garden.  This gave me 16 sections.  By this time it was late February in Houston.  It was already warm enough for shorts outside.  From start to finish the entire process too me all of 4 hours.  This included the removal of the grass which took the longest.  It was now time to get my plants ready.

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My Marathon http://www.andrewpmoore.com/my-marathon/ http://www.andrewpmoore.com/my-marathon/#comments Wed, 18 Jan 2012 02:27:00 +0000 http://www.andrewpmoore.com/?p=721 Well….  It has been months since I have posted.  I have been focused on my goals and not as much on keeping everyone up to speed.  I started this journey with a BHAG and I reached the point this last week of achieving as much of my goal as I want.  I guess I should explain.

Well….  It has been months since I have posted.  I have been focused on my goals and not as much on keeping everyone up to speed.  I started this journey with a BHAG and I reached the point this last week of achieving as much of my goal as I want.  I guess I should explain.

I started off early in 2011 with one goal in mind- to run an ultra marathon.  I planned on running at least 50 miles within the 12 months of posting.  I had run exactly 2 miles in complete succession prior to this statement.  I had no freaking idea what I was getting into.  I figured that I had a pair of Vibrams and had read Born to Run – I was good.  So I started on my journey to an ultra.

I began running in April and quickly found issues, which I discussed on the blog.  I had raw nipples and blisters on my feet.  My calves hurt. I look back on that time and laugh at the minor inconvenience of that pain.  It seemed daunting though.  I was slowly entering the hottest, driest summer that Texas had experienced in over 100 years and I did something dumb- I entered the Houston Marathon Lottery.

I found out the Houston Marathon is one of the flattest, fastest courses on earth.  It was June…  I knew the race was in January so I was training to run the race since May.  What I did not know was that there was a 6 month cut off for sign up AND that not everyone makes it.  I figured I would just rock up in November and pay the fee.  What I learned was that you had to enter a lottery. A lottery of PAIN!  I entered and “won”. I was in.

I was running 3 miles in succession at this point.  I was averaging 11 minute miles.  I would come home winded from my runs.  I was hitting walls.  So I went online and began to read and that’s when I found Hal Higdon.  I grabbed his book, Marathon, from the library.  This should be required reading for all endurance runners.  I realized I had to rebuild the way I was training and fix the way my body burned energy.  I posted a blog on Heart Rate and Aerobic zonesGo Slow to Go Fast……

I pushed through the hottest summer of my life.   I had to run at 9:30 at night… when it was only 95 degrees.  I began to ride a bike on Sundays to do cross training… anything to use my body without exerting lateral movement.  The fear of ripping a muscle was always in my mind.

It was close to September when I decided to join a local Triathlon.  My daughter who was 16 at the time joined as well.  It was in October.  The race was a sprint with a 300 meter pool swim, 10 mile bike ride and 5k run.  I finished in 1:10 in a pouring rain storm.  At this point I was running 7 miles at a time in succession.

Me and Kid!

Me and Kid!

I pushed through October and into November and then something funny happened.  I quit regular training.  I lost my drive.  I had been pushing for months and just got burnt out.  I was super skinny and was so focused on running, I was  not working more core or upper body.  I was tired of long runs and wanted to just rest.  This was not a good decision, but one I made.

I started running again in December for distance and pushed hard for a 14, 16 and 18 mile run the weeks approaching the marathon.  My 18 mile run took 3:30.  I realized that I did not like to run for that long.  I realized at the end of my long run, I did not want to run an ultra.  I loved running for up to 10 or 13 miles, but after that, it was a chore and I did not enjoy it.  Why would I take something that I actually enjoyed and turn it into a chore.  I had made up my mind- run the marathon, but no ultra.  It wasn’t because I didn’t want to push myself- it was because  if I did it, I risked losing the one thing that I learned to enjoy over the last few months and that was not worth it.

I took the last two weeks off before the race.  I ran a couple of short runs, but nothing that risked injury.

The race grew near and it was time to send the kids off with Nama and head to the race.  My loving and supportive wife spent the night with my downtown the evening before the race.  We ate spaghetti in The Village and watched Tom Brady beat down the Bronocs.  I woke up at 4:45 AM and got dressed.

The race was incredible.  I will blog about it more on my site in the coming weeks.  I could not tell anyone what it meant for me to be there and to run through my hometown.  It was amazing.  Each area of town I passed; each place I used to haunt and I passed it all on foot.  I finished running 26.2 miles in 4:59.  I blew out a personal best in the half marathon, but hit a wall at 18 and had to force myself through some pretty severe pain and mental frustration the last 6 miles.  Had I not taken off for a month, I may have been better prepared.

All in all- I feel like I reached my goal.  I believe that I have given my story and reached my BHAG.  I hope that I have inspired a few others.  My next goal is to write a book.  So- I am off to share the one good book I believe I have in my heart.

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My Experiment in Email http://www.andrewpmoore.com/my-experiment-in-email/ http://www.andrewpmoore.com/my-experiment-in-email/#comments Thu, 22 Sep 2011 16:55:41 +0000 http://www.andrewpmoore.com/?p=667 I have decided that I am going to apply some principles from “The Four Hour Work Week”.  I find myself being entirely too fractured during the day and I need to limit my distractions and make sure I am most effective for my team.

The first thing I am going to try is not checking email all day, all the time.  I began this process last night.  I have decided to check my email at 11AM and 4PM daily.  This has been an incredible challenge.  I keep wanting to grab my phone.  I am desperate to see what is happening and if I am missing anything.  So far, so good…  nothing groundbreaking has happened that I needed to know about in the last few hours.  I will update in a few days to let everyone know how this is going.  So far this is similar to when I quit smoking.  It feels good, but it still hurts.

Has anyone out there done this successfully?.. and if so- how did it go?

UPDATE:  July 2012

OK-  so this was not a miserable failure-  but it did not have the same outcome I had expected.  I went a few weeks without checking my email except for 2 times a day.  This was nice because it allowed me to detach and not get so worked up.  The problem was the mess I had created. People expected me to be on email.  It was not a simple matter of detaching.  I had built a culture of people communicating with me via email over years.  3 weeks was not going to fix it.  Neither was my Out of Office email.  People assumed I was on vacation because they did not read it, they just saw it was auto generated and assumed I was out.

What I found was that disabling the alerts on my office laptop and my phone helped me handle the stress of all that communication MUCH more effectively.  I was able to remove the auditory and visual queues that would set me to run over to my laptop or phone to see what was happening.  I was now in control of when I checked the messages.  The number of checks grew to a few times per hour, but that was much less than the every few minutes I would check as the dings and pop-ups alerted me to the next crisis or funny meme.

All in all I think I did OK.  I learned that everyone needs to turn off their phones from beeping with each new alert.  To be honest, its irritating and distracts from getting real work done.  By turning off alerts, it reminds us that we control the machines, they do not control us.

Anybody else ever give this a shot?

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The Blast Furnace http://www.andrewpmoore.com/the-blast-furnace/ Thu, 04 Aug 2011 01:59:05 +0000 http://www.andrewpmoore.com/?p=717 I opened my garage door and the air was sucked out of my lungs as the heat poured over the concrete and across my body.  It was 8:30 PM.  The temperature outside was 94 degrees.  Welcome to the life of an athlete in Houston in August.  I had to run 3 miles in order to stay on track for my marathon training… not that big a deal, I guessed.  Without water and a breeze, the last half mile was actually brutal.

http://ewpopwatch.files.wordpress.com/2011/02/billy-madison-05_510.jpg?w=510&h=276

I have been looking for information on heat in relation to training.  Specifically for running.  I have been unable to find anything conclusive in regard to being able to perform more effectively in cold weather after training in heat.  I would assume that when you train in high heat, your body is more adapted to cooling itself.  I am interested in anyone who can provide me some specific information.  Mostly because whenever I look online for training and heat, I typically find blogs and articles from people who complain about running in high heat or describe their terrible conditions in certain races.  This would be fine except they are bitching about running in 85 degree heat.

I just want to take this opportunity to acknowledge all the people who exercise in Houston or Las Vegas or Florida in the summer.  For the folks that push thorough 94 degree temperatures and drive their bodies to do unnatural things in even more unnatural temperatures..  thanks for keeping it classy.

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